Finlaggan Loch And Castle With Music On History Visit To Island Of Islay Inner Hebrides Scotland

Tour Scotland short 4K travel video clip, with Scottish music, of Finlaggan, Scottish Gaelic: Port an Eilein, on Eilean Mòr isle, on ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to the Island Of Islay, Inner Hebrides. The Loch, the island, and Finlaggan Castle lie on Islay to the North West of Ballygrant. Finlaggan was the seat of the Lords of the Isles and of Clan Donald, and were the administrative centre of the Lordship of the Isles during the 13th to 15th centuries, until 1493 when the lordship of the Isles fell to King James IV of Scotland, who administered the territory via a tenant in chief. Finlaggan Castle also known as Eilean Mòr Castle is a ruined fortified house located on the isle of Eilean Mór on Loch Finlaggan, Islay, Scotland. It was once a residence and stronghold of Lord of the Isles and Clan Donald.. In the first half of the 7th century, a monastic community was established on Eilean Mòr, the larger of the islands in the loch. This was either dedicated to or possibly founded by Saint Findlugan, an Irish monk and a contemporary of Saint Columba. The ruins we see today are from a castle built in the 13th century, with masonry walls. An earlier construction, likely timber, was erected in 1138 by Somerled, Lord of Argyll, Kintyre, and Lorne, the first Lord of the Isles. The 12th century building might have been constructed on the remains of an earlier Iron Age fort. The Lords of the Isles used the fortress as a principal court and meeting place of their clan chiefs. Iain Mor MacDonald, 3rd of Dunnyveg and his son Iain Cathanach MacDonald were taken prisoner at Finlaggan Castle, through the deception of MacIain of Ardnamurchan for the hanging and execution of the governor of Dunaverty Castle and were later tried and hung on the Burgh Muir, Edinburgh. In 1541 Finlaggan was held from the Crown by Donald MacGilleasbuig. The castle appears to have been demolished in the 15th and 16th century. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day. Find things to see and do in Scotland where you are always welcome. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Spring Road Trip Drive To Church And Graveyard On History Visit To Kinclaven Perthshire Scotland

Tour Scotland 4K Spring travel video , with Scottish music, of a road trip drive on ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to the Parish Church and graveyard on visit to Kinclaven, Perthshire, Britain, United Kingdom. Kinclaven is located in a bend of the River Tay opposite its confluence with the River Isla, ten miles north of Perth. The parish church was rebuilt in 1848. Built into the churchyard wall is the monument to Alexander Campbell, Bishop of Brechin 1608. There was an ancient castle in old Kinclaven which is said to have been built by Malcolm Canmore, and to have been for many centuries an occasional residence of the kings of Scotland, from which several of their charters are dated. During the wars that arose, from the contested succession to the throne, between Robert the Bruce and Baliol, the castle was occupied by an English garrison, which, being at an unguarded moment surprised by Sir William Wallace, was taken and dismantled so far as to render it no longer tenable as a place of strength. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day. Find things to see and do in Scotland where you are always welcome. The date for astronomical Spring is 20th March, ending on 21st June, while by the meteorological calendar, Spring starts on 1st March . When driving in Scotland slow down and enjoy the trip. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Coast And Waters With Music On Visit To Isle of Gigha Off The West Coast Of Kintyre Scotland

Tour Scotland short 4K travel video clip, with Scottish music, of coast, beaches and waters on ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to Isle of Gigha off the West Coast Of Kintyre, Britain, United Kingdom. This Scottish island has a long history, having been inhabited continuously since prehistoric times. It may have had an important role during the Kingdom of Dalriada and is the ancestral home of Clan MacNeill. It fell under the control of the Norse and the Lords of the Isles before becoming incorporated into modern Scotland and saw a variety of conflicts during the medieval period. There have been numerous shipwrecks on the surrounding coastal rocks and skerries. The island forms part of Argyll and Bute and has a usually resident population of about 160 people. The climate is mild with higher than average sunshine hours and the soils are fertile. The surname MacNeill was first found in on the islands of Barra, Gigha, Colonsay, and Oronsay. According to traditional records in 1049, Niall, a direct descendent of King Niall of the Nine Hostages, landed in Barra and founded the Clan MacNeill of Barra. MacNeill has been spelled MacNeil, MacNeill, MacNeal, MacNeilage, MacNeale, MacNeall, MacNeille, MacNeel, MacNiel, MacGreal, Mcneil, Mcneill, McNeal, Mcneal, Mcneall and many more. Neal MacNeill landed in New York, NY, America, in 1811. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day. Find things to see and do in Scotland where you are always welcome. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Boat Trip Along The Coastline On History Visit To Arbroath Angus Scotland

Tour Scotland 4K travel video of a boat trip from the harbour along the coastline of the North Sea on history visit to Arbroath, Angus, Britain, United Kingdom. In 1394 the Abbot John Gedy and the monks of Arbroath Abbey, and the townsmen of Arbroath, made an agreement with regard to the building of a harbour. Whatever the method of its construction, the first harbour was most probably a modest affair. In 1839, the old harbour was considerably improved, and was enlarged. Arbroath is located 98 miles North East of Glasgow, 50 miles South West of Aberdeen and 77 miles from Edinburgh and 17 miles North East of Dundee. Neighbouring villages include St Vigeans, Carmyllie, Friockheim, Colliston and Inverkeilor. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day. Find things to see and do in Scotland where you are always welcome. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Celtic Cross And Church With Music On History Visit To Kildalton Islay Inner Hebrides Scotland

Tour Scotland 4K travel video, with Scottish music, of the Celtic Cross and old parish Church and graveyard on ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to Kildalton, on the Island Of Islay, Inner Hebrides, Britain, United Kingdom. It was carved probably in the second half of the 8th century AD, and is closely related to crosses of similar date on Iona. It is often considered the finest surviving Celtic cross in Scotland, and is certainly one of the most perfect monuments of its date to survive on western Europe. The Kildalton Cross is sometimes called the Kildalton Great Cross or the Kildalton High Cross and stands 2.65 metres high by 1.32 metres wide. It is made from a single piece of a grey green coloured stone known as epidiorite, probably quarried at Port na Cille on the coast just under a mile to the south-east of where it now stands. The ruin of Kildalton Old Parish Church was heavily repaired in 1925 and again in the 1970s. It is probable that the church you see today dates back to the late 1100s or early 1200s. Internally it was a simple oblong, which was probably divided into a nave and a sanctuary by a wooden screen. In the ground within the church and around it are at least seventeen West Highland style recumbent grave slabs, in a range of patterns in common use during the 1300s and 1400s. The presence of the Kildalton Cross in the churchyard shows that there was a religious foundation at Kildalton for many centuries before the church whose remains still stand was built, and the grandeur of the cross is a strong indication that Kildalton was home to an important early monastery. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day. Find things to see and do in Scotland where you are always welcome. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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