Autumn Sunset On Visit To South Street In Perth Perthshire Scotland

Tour Scotland 4K Autumn travel video of sunset behind South Street on ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to Perth, Perthshire. Perth has been known as The Fair City since the publication of the story Fair Maid of Perth by Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott in 1828. During the later medieval period the city was also called St John's Toun or Saint Johnstoun by its inhabitants in reference to the main church dedicated to St John the Baptist. Scotland will adopt new border restrictions introduced by the UK Government after two cases of the Omicron coronavirus variant were detected in England. The two linked cases have been found in Nottingham and Brentwood, Essex, and are believed to have been contracted in southern Africa. No cases of the new variant have been confirmed in Scotland to date but there are already less people on the streets. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Autumn Grey Squirrel Opening Feeder Box On Visit Cottage Garden Scone By Perth Perthshire Scotland

Tour Scotland 4K late Autumn travel video of a Grey squirrel eating peanuts by opening my metal feeder box on a visit to my cottage garden in Scone by Perth, Perthshire. As its name suggests, this squirrel typically has a grey coat with white undersides, though the coat colour can also be quite brown at times. Grey squirrels are mainly herbivorous, eating acorns, hazel nuts, berries, fungi, buds and shoots, and even bark. During the Fall months squirrels are foraging for food. Squirrel movement decreases significantly in the winter months, with some squirrel species even hibernating during this time. Native to North America, grey squirrels were first introduced to the UK in the 19th century. The species has spread rapidly and is now common across the UK, in England and Wales, with the exception of north and western Scotland and some islands. One of our most familiar mammals, the grey squirrel can be found in woods, gardens and parks, often proving to be very tame. A grey squirrel can be easily distinguished from a red squirrel by its larger size, grey fur and ears without tufts. Autumn leaf color or colour is a phenomenon that affects the normally green leaves of many deciduous trees and shrubs by which they take on, during a few weeks in the Autumn season, various shades of red, yellow, purple, black, orange, pink, magenta, blue and brown. The phenomenon is commonly called autumn colours or autumn foliage in British English and fall colors, fall foliage or simply foliage in American English All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Autumn Road Trip Drive To Visit The Madoch Centre In St Madoes Perthshire Scotland

Tour Scotland late Autumn travel video of a road trip drive, with Scottish fiddle music, from Perth on ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to the Madoch Centre in St Madoes, Carse Of Gowrie, Perthshire. The Madoch Centre is run by St Madoes and Kinfauns Parish Church for the benefit of residents, the wider community and the local church. When driving in Scotland, slow down and enjoy the trip. Autumn leaf color or colour is a phenomenon that affects the normally green leaves of many deciduous trees and shrubs by which they take on, during a few weeks in the Autumn season, various shades of red, yellow, purple, black, orange, pink, magenta, blue and brown. The phenomenon is commonly called autumn colours or autumn foliage in British English and fall colors, fall foliage or simply foliage in American English. The surname Madoc is derived from the early Welsh personal name Madoc. This was also written as Madawc and Madog, from the Old Welsh name Matoc, which had the literal meaning of goodly. The name Madoc has seen various spelling variations: Maddox, Maddix, Maddick, Mattick, Matticks, Mattix, Maddock, Maddockes, Maddocks, Madocks, Madox, Madoch, Mattock and many more. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many people from Wales joined the general migration to North America in search of land, work, and freedom. These immigrants greatly contributed to the rapid development of the new nations of Canada and the United States. They also added a rich and lasting cultural heritage to their newly adopted societies. Investigation of immigration and passenger lists has revealed a number of people bearing the name Madoc: Henry Maddock settled in Delaware in 1682; John Maddock settled in Philadelphia in 1686; John Maddock settled in New Jersey in 1654; Henry Maddocks settled in Maine in 1630. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Autumn Road Trip Drive With Music From Dundee To Visit Perth Perthshire Scotland

Tour Scotland late Autumn travel video of a rainy, windy, afternoon road trip drive, with Scottish music, West on the A90 road from Dundee, on ancestry, genealogy, history visit to Perth, Perthshire. This A90 road originates in Edinburgh, it the travels west and over the Forth Road Bridge, before turning into the M90 motorway. At Perth, the M90 again becomes the A90, now running north east to Dundee and through the Kingsway road system. It then passes Forfar, Brechin, Stracathro, the site of an ancient Roman Camp, Stonehaven, Bridge of Muchalls, where the Burn of Muchalls flows under, near Muchalls Castle, near Saint Ternan's Church, Newtonhill, Portlethen, from there through the city of Aberdeen, crossing the Ythan Estuary, on to Peterhead on its way to Fraserburgh. Perth has been known as The Fair City since the publication of the story Fair Maid of Perth by Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott in 1828. During the later medieval period the city was also called St John's Toun or Saint Johnstoun by its inhabitants in reference to the main church dedicated to St John the Baptist, When driving in Scotland, slow down and enjoy the trip All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Autumn Road Trip Drive On History Visit To Broughty Ferry Tayside Scotland

Tour Scotland late Autumn travel video of a road trip drive, with Scottish fiddle music, through Dundee on a rainy and windy, ancestry, genealogy, family history visit to Broughty Ferry, Scottish Gaelic: Bruach Tatha; Scots: Brochtie on the East Coast of Tayside. Formerly a prosperous fishing and whaling village, in the 19th century Broughty Ferry became a haven for wealthy jute barons, who built their luxury villas in the suburb. As a result, Broughty Ferry was referred to at the time as the " richest square mile in Europe. ". The area was a separate burgh from 1864 until 1913, when it was incorporated into Dundee. Historically it is within the County of Angus. Thomas Smith, born in Broughty Ferry on 6 December 1752. He was a Scottish businessman and early lighthouse engineer. He was appointed as the first Chief Engineer to the Northern Lighthouse Board in 1786. Smith died at home in 2 Baxter's Place in Leith, Edinburgh, on 21 June 1815, aged 62. Janet Lindsay Greig was born 8 August 1874 in Broughty Ferry, to Jane (née Stocks) and Robert Greig, the second of seven children. She was educated at the High School of Dundee until the family migrated to Melbourne, Australia in 1889, where she then attended Brunswick Ladies College. Her father encouraged his children to pursue tertiary education, and in 1891 both she and her sister Jane enrolled at the medical school of the University of Melbourne. She graduated from the University , with a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery with honours in 1895. For many years, Greig ran a private practice in Fitzroy, Victoria and worked as a consultant from Collins Street, Melbourne. She was one of the founding members of the Queen Victoria Hospital for Women and Children and was an honorary medical staff member there for 54 years. When a new pathology wing was constructed at the hospital in 1937, it was named after Greig. In 1940 she was admitted to the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and elected President of the Victorian Medical Women's Society. Greig retired in 1947 and focused on her research of migraines. She died in 1950 while visiting London, England, on a research trip. Gordon Webster He was born on 28 October 1841 at Panmurefield at Broughty Ferry near Dundee, the only son of Gordon Webster, a bleacher, and his wife, Elizabeth Simpson. He was educated at the High School of Dundee and originally trained as an engineer and was apprenticed at Low's Foundry in Monifieth. He then studied at the University of Edinburgh graduating MA in 1867 before training as a Free Church of Scotland minister at New College, Edinburgh. He was ordained by the Free Church of Scotland in Girvan in 1872. In December 1887 he moved to St Andrew's Church in Christchurch, New Zealand. The church is an interesting example of prefabricated construction, over clad in timber and is a listed building. He served as Moderator in 1898 and retired in 1900. He returned to Scotland and had unsuccessful surgery on an internal complaint in May 1903 and died at 22 Corrennie Gardens in Morningside, Edinburgh on 18 July 1903. He is buried in Doune Cemetery in Girvan. A memorial service was held in St Andrews Church in Christchurch on 26 July led by the Rev Mr Erwin. David Blair or Davy Blair was born in Broughty Ferry on 11 November 1874. He was was a British merchant seaman with the White Star Line, which had reassigned him from the RMS Titanic just before its maiden voyage. Due to his hasty departure, he accidentally kept a key to a storage locker believed to contain the binoculars intended for use by the crow's nest lookout. The absence of any binoculars within the crow's nest is believed to be one of the main contributory factors in the Titanic’s ultimate demise. Blair was First Officer on the SS Majestic in 1913 when a coaler jumped overboard; the night before, a fellow crew member had succeeded in drowning himself. While a lifeboat was organized, Blair jumped into the ocean waters and swam toward the man, who was now swimming for the ship. Though the boat reached the man first, Blair was commended for his action in The New York Times and received money from the passengers and a medal from the Royal Humane Society. Blair, and Charles Lightoller, who survived the Titanic disaster, served aboard the RMS Oceanic when it ran aground in 1914. As the navigator, Blair received the blame for the grounding at the resulting enquiry. Blair died on 10 January 1955 in Hendon, Middlesex, England. All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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