Bagpipes And Drums Music West Fife Schools Pipe Band Scotland



Tour Scotland travel video compilation of the Scottish bagpipes and drums music of the West Fife Schools Pipe Band on visit to Markinch in Fife. The Great Highland Bagpipe or Piob Mhor, is an instrument with opposing harsh shrills and graceful tones, meant to be played outdoors, in the open countryside and it is well suited in inspiring Scotsmen, and women, on the field of battle and in the aftermath, mourning the fallen, or celebrating victory. Through history, pipers are remembered for being mortally or seriously wounded the latter whilst continuing to play in the face of adversity. The kilt first appeared as the great kilt, the breacan or belted plaid, during the 16th century in the Scottish Highlands and is Gaelic in origin. The filleadh mòr or great kilt was a full length garment whose upper half could be worn as a cloak draped over the shoulder, or brought up over the head. A version of the filleadh beag, philibeg, or small kilt, was also known as the walking kilt. The small kilt or modern kilt emerged in the 18th century, and is essentially the bottom half of the great kilt. Since the 19th century, it has become associated with the wider culture of Scotland, and more broadly with Gaelic or Celtic heritage. It is most often made of woollen cloth in a tartan pattern.
Fife is a name of obscure etymology. Tradition has it that the name is derived from an eponymous Fib, one of the seven sons of Cruithne, legendary founding father of the Picts.

Hugh Fife, aged 38, was a miner, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship William Stevenson; Thomas Fife, aged 26, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship Punjab; Agnes Fife, aged 16, arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship London in 1842; Francis Fife, landed in Virginia, America, in 1701; John Fife, landed in New England, America, in 1738; John Fife settled in Maryland, America, in 1739.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Dreich Summer Drive South Over Queensferry Crossing Firth Of Forth Scotland



Tour Scotland Summer travel video of a dreich road trip drive South from Fife, with Scottish music, to visit and cross the Queensferry Crossing the new Forth Road Bridge which spans the Firth of Forth. Dreich is a Scottish word meaning dull and cloudy. The Queensferry Crossing, formerly the Forth Replacement Crossing, is a road bridge built alongside the existing Forth Road Bridge which carries the M90 motorway across the Firth of Forth between Lothian, at South Queensferry, into Fife and onwards to Perthshire, at North Queensferry. The bridge is 683 feet high above high tide, equivalent to approximately 48 London buses stacked on top of each other and 25% higher than existing Forth Road Bridge. It is estimated the construction involved approximately 10 million man hours. The Queensferry Crossing is 33 miles from Perth, Perthshire 14 miles from Edinburgh and 47 miles from Glasgow.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Summer Drive From Bridge Of Earn Through The Fair City Of Perth To Scone Perthshire Scotland



Tour Scotland Summer travel video of a road trip drive, with Scottish music, from Bridge of Earn, onwards, down Edinburgh Road and, through the city centre of Perth to visit Scone. Perthshire. Perth has been known as The Fair City since the publication of the story Fair Maid of Perth by Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott in 1828. During the later medieval period the city was also called St John's Toun or Saint Johnstoun by its inhabitants in reference to the main church dedicated to St John the Baptist. In 1803 the 3rd Earl of Mansfield commissioned the architect William Atkinson to rebuild the 1580s Abbot's Palace, and what emerged was Scone Palace. In 1805, as part of the landscaping of the grounds of the new Scone Palace, the residents of what was later known as Old Scone were resettled in a new village over a mile to the east. This was originally known as New Scone to distinguish it from its predecessor, though it has since simply become known as Scone. Half a mile of open countryside separates Scone from the north eastern edge of Perth, but in many ways it has become a suburb of its larger neighbour.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Bagpipes And Drums Music Police Scotland Pipe Band Scotland



Tour Scotland travel video compilation of the Scottish bagpipes and drums music of the Police Scotland Pipe Band on visit to Fife. The band wears Carnegie of Fife tartan kilts. The band was established in September 2007 as the Fife Constabulary Pipe Band, and was placed in the senior grade by the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association in February the following year. Their first competition, at the Dunbar Highland Games in May 2008, saw them awarded first prize. The first Pipe Major was James Murray, with Andrew Mathieson starting as Pipe Sergeant, both having left Grade 1 band Shotts and Dykehead. When James Murray announced he was to emigrate to Australia, Mathieson took over as Pipe Major. Douglas Murray became Pipe Major in July 2013. The drum corps of a pipe band consists of a section of drummers playing Highland snare drums and the bass section. In the early days of pipe bands, rope tension snare drums were common, but as the technology evolved, so did the music. Pipe band drummers now play on drums with very tight, knitted kevlar heads, designed for maximum tension to create a very crisp and strident sound. Due to technological innovations and changing aesthetics, this crispness has become an integral part of the pipe band sound. Since today's drum is so facile as a result of its design, players are often able to execute extremely complicated and technically demanding rudimentary patterns.

The surname Carnegie was first found in Angus, Gaelic: Aonghas, part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and present day Council Area of Angus, formerly known as Forfar or Forfarshire, where there was recorded a family of great antiquity seated at Carnegie in the parish of Carmyllis in that shire. Confirmation of the grant of lands of Cairynegy was made by King David of Scotland in 1358 to then Chief of the Clan John Carnegie. He was descended from Jocelyn of Balinhard who was the progenitor of the family. Carnegie has been written Carnegie, Carnechie, Carnegey, Carnagie, Carnagee and many more.

Mrs. Carnegie, a Scottish settler travelled from Greenock listed with a servant aboard the ship Philip Laing arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 15th April 1848; David Carnegie, landed in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1749; William Carnegie, arrived in Pennsylvania, America, in 1848; John Carnegie, aged 19, arrived in New York, America, in 1869.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Summer Afternoon Road Trip Drive Bridge Of Earn Perthshire Scotland



Tour Scotland travel video of a Summer afternoon road trip drive, with Scottish music, West on the A90 road from Dundee and over Friarton Bridge on to visit Bridge Of Earn just South of Perth, Perthshire. Bridge of Earn Scottish Gaelic: Drochaid Èireann, is a small town in the parish of Dunbarney often referred to simply as The Brig. The parish of Dunbarney was very much part of the traditional agricultural economy of lowland Scotland up to the late 19th century, with most of the inhabitants engaged in agriculture or associated rural crafts. The traffic on the main north road from Edinburgh also gave a certain scope for the inn and hotel trade to accommodate travellers. Since the Second World War, Bridge of Earn has increasingly become a dormitory town for families whose wage-earners commute to Perth, Dundee, Edinburgh or other large towns, and this has led to a great expansion in the numbers of homes being built, and a corresponding increase in the number of local shops and services.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.