Tour Scotland Video Of Old Photographs Of Buchanan Street Glasgow



Tour Scotland wee travel video Blog of old photographs of Buchanan Street, one of the main shopping thoroughfares in Glasgow, Scotland. Buchanan Street was first feued in 1777 and was named after a wealthy Tobacco Lord and former Lord Provost of Glasgow, Andrew Buchanan of Buchanan. He was proprietor of the ground on which it was formed from Argyle Street as far north as Gordon Street. Andrew had died in 1759 and his tobacco empire was inherited by his son James Buchanan of Drumpellier, also twice Lord Provost of Glasgow. The family made huge losses following the American Revolution of 1776, losing all their plantations in Virginia. Sale of the land was probably at least in part to offset these losses. At its north end are the Buchanan Galleries and the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall. The Princes Square mall and a flagship branch of the House of Fraser department store are opposite one another further south.

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Tour Scotland Video Of Old Photographs Of Sauchiehall Street Glasgow



Tour Scotland wee travel video Blog of old photographs of Sauchiehall Street one of the main shopping and business streets in the city centre of Glasgow, Scotland. Sauchiehall Street is one of the most famous streets in Glasgow, partly due to its rich history. The desire of wealthy merchants to own property on the outskirts of the city meant that it was expanded and as a result of this Sauchiehall Street grew. Around 1820 the street was known as Saughie-haugh road, a quiet narrow road with a number of villas and terraces with distinguished names. After the street was widened in 1846, older buildings were replaced with tenements in the 1850s and then some commercial buildings in the 1870s. Over time, the street has been home to a number of notable buildings. This includes the Glasgow Empire Theatre which was opened in 1897 at 31–35 Sauchiehall Street. The Theatre played host to big names such as Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland, Dorothy Lamour, Jack Benny and Danny Kaye before it closed on 31 March 1963. The Royalty Theatre was also situated on Sauchiehall Street, opening in 1879 and showing operas, comedies and plays up until its lease ran out in 1913. Afterwards, during the First World War, it was purchased by the YMCA to become a hostel for soldiers and sailors. The building lived out the rest of its days after the war as the Lyric Theatre, before it was demolished in the late 1950s.

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Tour Scotland Video Of Old Photographs Of Portgordon Moray



Tour Scotland wee travel video Blog of old photographs of Portgordon, or sometimes Port Gordon, Scottish Gaelic: Port Ghòrdain, a village in Moray, south west of Buckie, Scotland. Portgordon was established in 1797 by Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon as a fishing village. In 1797 houses were built for ten fishermen and their families from Nether Buckie. This was the third new village the Duke had established, but unlike Fochabers and Tomintoul before, this was a smaller venture and little planning was done with regards to street layout. The intermediate railway station was opened, first as Port Gordon Station, on 1 May 1886. It was renamed Portgordon Station by the London and North Eastern Raliway before 1938 and closed to regular passenger traffic on 6 May 1968. A boat building industry began, with local yards first constructing Zulu’s and from 1903 steam drifters. In 1907 one yard employed fifty men and launched a drifter every month or so but this business in drifters had dried up by 1915, though the yard continued to produce salmon cobles. During World War II in 1940, two German spies, Karl Drucke and Vera Erikson were captured at the railway station and held at the police station A memorial to those who had lost their lives during World War I was unveiled on 9 June 1921. It is a fifteen foot Celtic cross of granite, situated in East High Street. It records the names of 28 killed during World War I and a further 28 from World War II.

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Tour Scotland Video Of Old Photographs Of Burghead Moray



Tour Scotland wee travel video Blog of old photographs of Burghead, Scottish Gaelic: Am Broch, is a small town in Moray located eight miles North West of Elgin, Scotland. The present town was built between 1805 and 1809, destroying in the process more than half of the site of an important Pictish hill fort. General Roy’s map shows the defences as they existed in the 18th century but he wrongly attributed them to the Romans. The fort was probably a major Pictish centre and was where carved slabs depicting bulls were found; they are known as the " Burghead Bulls ". A chambered well of some considerable antiquity was discovered in 1809 and walls and a roof were later added to help preserve it. Each year on 11 January a fire festival known as the Burning of the Clavie takes place; it is thought that the festival dates back to the 17th century, although it could easily predate this by several centuries. Burghead is often known by locals as The Broch, a nickname also applied to Fraserburgh in nearby Aberdeenshire. Burghead intermediate railway station was opened on 10 October 1892 to supercede the older station on the extension of the line from Burghead to Hopeman. It was closed to regular passenger traffic on 14 September 1931. In the past fishing, particularly herring fishing, was a very large part of the economy of Burghead.

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Tour Scotland Video Of Old Photographs Of Johnstone Renfrewshire



Tour Scotland wee travel video Blog of old photographs of Johnstone, Scottish Gaelic: Baile Iain, a town in the council area of Renfrewshire and larger historic county of the same name in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. This Scottish town was a planned community created in the latter half of the 18th century by the local Laird, George Ludovic Houston who held an estate in the town, the remains of which are known as Johnstone Castle. Industrial development brought coal mining, thread-making and cotton weaving to Johnstone causing it to grow considerably in size, expanding out in the 1930s with a number of newly built residential areas which addressed the problem of population density in the historic area of the town. Today it supports a small commercial centre and serves as a commuter settlement for Paisley and Glasgow. Shanks Park in Johnstone is named after a leading industrialist of the nineteenth century who owned a company of heavy machine toolmakers, Thomas Shanks and Company. Thomas Shanks was Johnstone's first chief magistrate. Thomas's daughter, Mrs J Polson, gifted the park to the town in the name of her late father.

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