Tour Scotland Travel Video Road Trip Drive Around The City Centre Of Edinburgh



Tour Scotland travel video Blog of a dreich road trip drive on the streets around the city centre on ancestry visit to Edinburgh, Scotland. Dreich is a Scottish word, meaning, overcast, dull and cloudy. The capital city of Scotland, Edinburgh has a long history which can be dated back to the Middle Ages. Edinburgh began as a fort known as Castle Rock which is still visible today. The fort was easy to defend and when the English captured this area of Scotland in the 7th century they named the area Eiden’s burgh. The area was recaptured by the Scots in the 10th century and in the late 11th century the king built a castle over the fort. By the 12th century, Edinburgh was a thriving community. By 1500 it is believed that Edinburgh had a population of 12,000. In the next 50 years, this would rise to 15,000 which would make it a large town at the time. The 17th century saw growth in Edinburgh both in terms of size and prosperity. There were outbreaks of the plague in 1604 and 1645, but the city recovered. In 1621, thatched roofs were banned within the city as they were seen as a fire hazard. In 1752 it was proposed to expand Edinburgh but it is not until 1767 that the plans of the New Town were designed by James Craig. By the middle of the eighteenth century Edinburgh became a popular place for intellectuals, especially in philosophy, history, medicine, science and economics. Between 1768 and 1771, the Encyclopaedia Britannica was published in Edinburgh. During the twentieth century more museums, department stores and other top attractions for tourists were constructed. This sector grew rapidly and by the end of the twentieth century it had become a popular tourist destination.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Travel Video Antonine Roman Wall Distance Slab Edinburgh



Tour Scotland travel video Blog of an Antonine Roman Wall Distance Slab on ancestry visit to the National Museum in Edinburgh, Scotland. The distance slab from Bridgeness near Edinburgh on the Antonine Wall commemorating the construction of the Wall by the Twentieth Legion. On the left side there is a cavalryman spearing some Britons. On the right side a sacrifice to the goddess of Victory is taking place. Four men watch another man in a toga, probably the legionary commander, who is about to sacrifice a pig, sheep and bull. To accompany the ceremony there is music from a flute player.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Travel Video Setting Sun Culloden Moor Battlefield By Inverness



Tour Scotland travel video Blog of of the sun setting on Culloden Moor Battlefield near Inverness on ancestry visit to the Highlands of Scotland. The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle fought on British soil. It was fought on 16 April 1746 and saw the Jacobite army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart defeated by the army of the Hanoverian King George II under the leadership of the Duke of Cumberland. The battle put an end to Jacobite hopes of restoring the Stuart dynasty to the British throne.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Travel Video Winter Drive Single Track Road Rural Perthshire



Tour Scotland travel video Blog of a sunny road trip drive, with Scottish accordion music, on a single track road on ancestry visit to rural Perthshire, Scotland. A single track road or one lane road is a road that permits two way travel but is not wide enough in most places to allow vehicles to pass one another, although sometimes two compact cars can pass. This kind of road is common in rural areas across the United Kingdom and elsewhere. The term is widely used in Scotland, particularly in the Highlands and Islands.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Travel Video Road Trip Drive From Dunblane To Perth Perthshire



Tour Scotland travel video Blog of a road trip drive, with Scottish music, from the High Street in Dunblane, East on the A9 major road with side trips through Blackford, Gleneagles, Auchterarder and Aberuthven all the way into Perth on ancestry visit to Perthshire, Scotland. The A9 is a major road running from the Falkirk council area in central Scotland to Scrabster Harbour, Thurso in the far north, via Stirling, Bridge of Allan, Perth and Inverness in the Highlands.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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