Wednesday, 8 February 2017

Old Photograph Golf Club Members Carnoustie Scotland


Old photograph of golf club members outside the Clubhouse on the Golf Course in Carnoustie, Scotland. Golf is recorded as having been played at Carnoustie in the early 16th century. In 1890, the 14th Earl of Dalhousie, who owned the land, sold the links to the local authority. It had no funds to acquire the property, and public fundraising was undertaken and donated to the council. The original course was of ten holes, crossing and recrossing the Barry Burn; it was designed by Allan Robertson who was born in St Andrews, Fife, assisted by Old Tom Morris who was also born in St Andrews, and opened in 1842. The opening of the coastal railway from Dundee to Arbroath in 1838 brought an influx of golfers from as far afield as Edinburgh, anxious to tackle the ancient links. This led to a complete restructuring of the course, extended in 1867 by Old Tom Morris to the 18 holes which had meanwhile become standardized. Two additional courses have since been added: the Burnside Course and the shorter though equally testing Buddon Links. Carnoustie first played host to The Open Championship in 1931, after modifications to the course in 1926 by James Braid who was was born in Earlsferry, in the East Neuk of Fife. The winner then was Tommy Armour, from Edinburgh. Later Open winners at Carnoustie include Henry Cotton of England in 1937, Ben Hogan of the USA in 1953, Gary Player of South Africa in 1968, Tom Watson of the USA in 1975, Paul Lawrie of Scotland in 1999 and Pádraig Harrington of Ireland in 2007. The last three championships were all won in playoffs.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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