Tour Scotland Video Dunedin Music And Dance King Edward Street Perth Perthshire



Tour Scotland video of traditional Scottish music and dancing by Dunedin Dancers from Edinburgh at the International Folk Dance Festival on visit to King Edward Street in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Video Fish And Chips Kinnears Inn Scone By Perth Perthshire



Tour Scotland video of traditional fish and chips at Kinnears Inn, 8 Angus Road, in Scone by Perth, Perthshire, Scotland. Fish and chips became a common meal among the working classes in Scotland as a consequence of the rapid development of trawl fishing in the North Sea, and the development of railways which connected the ports to major industrial cities during the second half of the 19th century, which meant that fresh fish could be rapidly transported to the heavily populated areas.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Video Windsurfing Elie East Neuk Of Fife



Tour Scotland video of a man attempting windsurfing by the harbour at Elie on windy day visit to the harbour in Elie on ancestry visit to the East Neuk of Fife, Scotland. Windsurfing is a surface water sport that combines elements of surfing and sailing. Many people credit S. Newman Darby with the origination of windsurfing by 1964 on the Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania, USA when he invented the sailboard. Elie watersports is an RYA Training Centre for hire or instruction in a wide variety of watersports including sailing, windsurfing, canoeing and waterskiing. Elie Harbour is situated on the north coast of the Firth of Forth. The surrounding village is one of Scotland's most popular seaside resorts. The Harbour is a sheltered, sandy, drying out harbour suitable for keel boats up to 30 feet in length, and for dinghies and power boats.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Video Franz Schubert Sand Sculpture Crail East Neuk Of Fife



Tour Scotland video of the Franz Schubert sand sculpture outside the Honeypot Tearoom on visit to the Festival in the fishing village of Crail in the East Neuk of Fife, Scotland. Franz Peter Schubert, born 31 January 1797, died 19 November 1828, was an Austrian composer. Schubert died before his 32nd birthday, but was extremely prolific during his lifetime. His output consists of over six hundred secular vocal works (mainly Lieder), seven complete symphonies, sacred music, operas, incidental music and a large body of chamber and piano music. Appreciation of his music while he was alive was limited to a relatively small circle of admirers in Vienna, but interest in his work increased significantly in the decades following his death. Felix Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann, Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and other 19th-century composers discovered and championed his works. Today, Schubert is ranked among the greatest composers of the late Classical and early Romantic eras and is one of the most frequently performed composers of the early nineteenth century.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Video Lorn Furnace Bonawe



Tour Scotland video of the Bonawe Iron Furnace, also called the Lorn Furnace, on ancestry visit to Bonawe, Argyll, Scotland. It operated in the middle of the eighteenth century, with the aim of producing pig iron. Central to this complex was a charcoal fired blast furnace. The industrial complex was built in 1753 by Richard Ford's small business, the Newland Company. The site was chosen because there was enough wood in the area for the production of charcoal, as well as the fact that there was enough water pressure in the river to drive a water wheel. As the company itself was established in Cumbria, the blast furnace was managed by a local representative of the firm. During construction, most of the building materials were brought in from Cumbria. For the furnace to produce pig iron, it first had to be brought up to temperature, which took about one week. The oven was used almost continuously for nine months at a time. As of 1750, the use of coke as fuel was becoming common. The first blast furnace in Scotland which made use of coke was built in 1759 near Falkirk. This new development in the production of iron in the complex made Bonawe less profitable. In the nineteenth century, production fell sharply and the complex was closed in 1876.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Tour Scotland Video Bagpipes Music King Edward Street Perth Perthshire



Tour Scotland video of Pipers playing traditional Scottish bagpipes music at the International Folk Dance Festival on visit to King Edward Street in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland. Though popular belief sets varying dates for the introduction of bagpipes to Scotland, concrete evidence is limited until approximately the 15th century. One Clan still owns a remnant of a set of bagpipes said to have been carried at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. However, written evidence for Scottish bagpipes is more definite in 1396, when records of the Battle of the North Inch of Perth reference " warpipes " being carried into battle.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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