Tuesday, 16 January 2018

Old Travel Blog Photograph Post Office Possilpark Glasgow Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the Post Office in Possilpark, Glasgow, Scotland. Possilpark is a district north of the River Clyde. The district's hub is Saracen Street. The area developed around Saracen Foundry of Walter MacFarlane and Company, which was the main employer. In the wake of the Saracen Foundry's closure in 1967. Walter MacFarlane was the man who renamed the estate of Possil to Possilpark, which grew from a population of 10 people in 1872, to 10,000 by 1891. MacFarlane oversaw the removal of all the woodlands and after creating railway access to his foundry, laid out the rest of the park land as a grid plan of streets and tenements, including naming the main street running through the new suburb, Saracen Street. The Saracen foundry made a series of decorative iron works, from railings and water fountains to park bandstands. These were exported all over the British Empire, and can still be found in abundance in many parts of North Glasgow. After World War II, the combination of the collapse of the British Empire, the move away from steam power and the adaptation of new designs and materials meant a vast decline in orders for Saracen's standard cast iron designs. The MacFarlane company moved into standard foundry work, including being one of five foundries casting Sir Giles Gilbert Scott's classic K6 telephone box for Post Office Telephones. After a take over of the company in 1965, the works closed and the infrastructure was demolished in 1967.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph Road By Loch Eck Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the road by Loch Eck located North of Dunoon, Scotland. This is a freshwater loch located on the Cowal peninsula. It is seven miles long. Apart from Loch Lomond, it is the only naturally occurring habitat of the Powan fish. Loch Eck is within the Argyll Forest Park which, is itself part of the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park. The loch is also an impounding reservoir with a concrete dam measuring 0.870 metres high. The dam was completed in 1973. Loch Eck now supplies the freshwater to much of the southeast of Cowal, including Dunoon.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Dunans Bridge Glendaruel Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of Dunans Bridge in Glendaruel, Cowal, Argyll, Scotland. Dunans Bridge was designed by Thomas Telford. It is located by Dunans Castle. It was built for John Fletcher of Dunans, to commemorate the battle of Waterloo. The bridge was completed in 1815, and predates the 1864 elaboration of Dunans House by Kerr into a Franco Baronial " castle ". The three arched rubble construction is considered internationally important as it is the only extant bridge of this type. It stands over 49 feet from the river bed and has been voted one of Scotland's ten best bridges. It was built to replace the now destroyed " swing bridge ". Though it is of a kind often constructed by Telford, the three arches, gargoyles and eight hexagonal piers, as well as its sheer height of 52 feet, make it unique.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Hermiston Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of cottages in Hermiston, a hamlet formerly in the County of Midlothian and now part of Edinburgh, Scotland. It is north of the Heriot Watt University Riccarton Campus and west of the Hermiston Quay commercial development. Hermiston is bounded by the A71 Calder Road to the south and the Union Canal to the north with the M8 motorway just beyond. The hamlet forms the Hermiston Conservation Area.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Wilson Tweed Shop Killin Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the Wilson Tweed Shop in Killin, Scotland. Killin is a village situated at the western head of Loch Tay in Stirling area, formerly Perthshire. Killin railway station was on the Killin Railway. The railway station was officially closed on 1 November 1965. The MacNab Clan were once dominant here, and have long been associated with Killin. Their ancient burial ground is on Inchbuie in the River Dochart, just below the falls, and is visible from the bridge in Killin. In 1767 the minister of Killin, James Stuart, published the first New Testament in Scottish Gaelic.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph Trochry Perthshire Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of Trochry, Perthshire, Scotland. The Stewarts of Grandtully held the Barony of Strathbraan from the early 17th century and Meikle Trochry was mentioned in the Act of Parliament establishing the Barony. There are a few remains of Trochry Castle located in a private garden, with no public access.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph Maxwellheugh Mill Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of Maxwellheugh Mill near Kelso, Scotland. Maxwellheugh Mill lies to the north of Springwood Park near the confluence of the Rivers Tweed and Teviot. The rubble built mill stands two storeys in height and has later external buttresses. Although the mill was originally water powered, the mill wheel was replaced by a turbine in the early twentieth century. It has a prominent circular kiln ventilator, with a revolving top. In 1860 the mill building was described as being a flour and corn mill.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph River Ruel Glendaruel Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the River Ruel in Glendaruel, Cowal, Argyll, Scotland. Glendaruel is thought to be one of the glens praised in the Gaelic poem The Lament of Deirdre,in which reference is made to a Glenndaruadh. It is found in the 15th-century Glenmasan manuscript, which may go back to an original written down in 1238. Deirdre is a tragic heroine in Irish mythology, and in the poem she is lamenting the necessity of leaving Scotland to return to Ireland.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph Princess View River Findhorn Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the Princess View over the River Findhorn near Forres, Moray, Scotland. On 23 June 1496 King James IV of Scotland issued a Royal Charter laying down the rights and privileges that the town's people are believed to have held by an earlier charter since the reign of King David I some 300 years earlier. Shakespeare's play Macbeth locates Duncan's castle in Forres, and the Three Witches meet on a heath near the town in the third scene of the drama. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph Pub Wanlockhead Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of a Pub in Wanlockhead, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. This village is located in the Lowther Hills and one mile south of Leadhills at the head of the Mennock Pass, which forms part of the Southern Uplands. It is Scotland's highest village. Wanlockhead owes its existence to the lead and other mineral deposits in the surrounding hills. These deposits were first exploited by the Romans. The village was founded permanently in 1680 when the Duke of Buccleuch built a lead smelting plant and workers cottages. A branch railway also the highest in Scotland, served the village from 1901 to 1939.



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Monday, 15 January 2018

Old Travel Photograph Post Office And Bed And Breakfast Isle of Gigha Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of a Post Office and Bed and Breakfast on the Isle of Gigha, a small island off the West coast of Kintyre, in Argyll, Scotland. Gigha has a long history, having been inhabited continuously since prehistoric times. It may have had an important role during the Kingdom of Dalriada and is the ancestral home of Clan MacNeill. It fell under the control of the Norse and the Lords of the Isles before becoming incorporated into modern Scotland and saw a variety of conflicts during the medieval period. The population of Gigha peaked at over 700 in the eighteenth century, but during the 20th century the island had numerous owners, which caused various problems in developing the island. By the beginning of the 21st century resident numbers had fallen to only 98. However a community buy out has transformed the island, which now has a growing population and a variety of new commercial activities to complement farming and tourism.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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