Old Photograph Beach Collieston Aberdeenshire Scotland


Old photograph of the beach at Collieston, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The earliest recorded history of Collieston is of the arrival of St Ternan, a Columban monk on a mission to convert the local picts to Christianity. Ternan, is believed to have been born in Fordoun in Angus about AD 440. He established a small monastery on the north side of the River Dee near the current graveyard in what is now the town of Banchory. As well as preaching the Christian gospel, he and his followers taught the local people farming, arts and crafts. Churches in Banchory and surrounding area bear the name of St Ternan.



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Old Photograph Wedding Car Dingwall Scotland


Old photograph of a wedding car in Dingwall, Scotland. In 1411 the Battle of Dingwall is said to have taken place between the Clan Mackay and the Clan Donald. Dingwall formerly served as the county town of the county of Ross and Cromarty. It lies near the head of the Cromarty Firth where the valley of the Peffery unites with the alluvial lands at the mouth of the Conon, 14 miles North West of Inverness.



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Old Photograph Strathkendrick Hotel Fintry Scotland


Old photograph of the Strathkendrick Hotel in Fintry village in Stirlingshire, Scotland. A Scottish village nestled in the strath of the Endrick Water between the Campsie Fells and the Fintry Hills, some 19 miles north of Glasgow. The village is located at the head of the Strathendrick valley high up on the Endrick Water. Alexander Spiers built a water powered cotton mill and whisky distillery around 1789 and the village developed to serve the mill workers. Fintry is a Church of Scotland Parish in the Presbytery of Stirling. The kirk is located to the East of the village. The parish minister for Fintry is shared with Balfron with the Manse located there. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day.



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Old Photograph Lawn Bowling Green Inverbervie Scotland


Old photograph of the lawn bowling green in Inverbervie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. A coastal Scottish town located South of Stonehaven. Inverbervie appears in written history at least as far back as the 12th century AD; in a document relating to Arbroath Abbey, Simon of Inverbervie is noted as having witnessed a charter transferring the lands of Balfeith to the Abbey. Inverbervie was formerly a royal burgh from 1342 to 1975 and a parliamentary burgh from 1708 to 1950, the former status being conferred by King David II of Scotland for hospitality he and his Queen received when shipwrecked there the previous year when returning from exile. Scottish bowlers developed the present flat green game, established rules, worked out a uniform code of laws, and were instrumental in saving the game for posterity. The ancient game of bowls has always been dear to the heart of every true Scot, and it has always held a prominent place in the history and literature of Scotland. To the Scots goes the credit also for giving the game an international background, as emigrant Scots enthusiastically carried the game with them to all parts of the world. Today there are more than 200 public bowling greens in the City of Glasgow alone.



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Old Photograph Hotel And Post Office Kincardine O'Neil Scotland


Old photograph of the hotel and Post Office in Kincardine O'Neil located between Banchory and Aboyne, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Since ancient times there was a crossing of the Dee River at Kincardine O'Neil. Locations of the Dee crossings along with alignment of ancient trackways formed a major impetus for location of early castles and settlements. In the vicinity of Kincardine O'Neil the Middle Ages trackways to the south had a particular influence on development in and around Kincardine O'Neil and Aboyne Castle. In the 19th century, the Deeside Railway bypassed the village, impeding the expansion of the settlement, unlike towns nearby. By 1895 the population of Kincardine O'Neil exceeded 200. Most of the present buildings were built in the 19th century.



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Old Photograph Fishwives Gutting Herring Harbour Wick Scotland


Old photograph of fishwives gutting herring by the harbour in Wick, Caithness. Scotland. Men and women came from across the Highlands and from the Western Isles and Outer Hebrides to crew the fishing boats and to work in the herring curing yards here. The women worked in crews of three, two gutters and one packer. The cured herring were shipped in barrels mainly to the ports of Europe and the Baltic countries.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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