Old Photograph Dunyvaig Castle Scotland


Old photograph of the ruins of Dunyvaig Castle on the shore of Lagavulin Bay, two miles from Port Ellen, on the Island of Islay, Scotland. The castle was once a naval base of the Lord of the Isles, chiefs of Clan Donald. It was held by the chiefs of the Clan MacDonald of Dunnyveg. Forfeited in 1493, the castle passed to the MacIans of Ardnamurchan. Afterwards the castle was leased to the MacDonalds, then the Campbells and back to the MacDonalds. Surrendered to Andrew Stuart, 3rd Lord Ochiltree and a royal force in 1608 by Angus MacDonald, 8th of Dunnyveg and garrisoned with royal troops with the constable Andrew Knox. In 1614, the castle was taken by Ranald Og MacDonald, however was retaken by Angus Og MacDonald, who attempted to bargain the castle's surrender. Knox attempted to retake the castle and was defeated and compelled to retreat. Knox left his son Thomas and his nephew John Knox of Ranfurly as hostages for his good faith. The hostages were freed by John Graham and on 6 January 1615, Sir John Campbell of Calder, with the assistance of Sir Oliver Lambart, retook the castle. The castle was seized in 1647 by the Covenanters and passed into the hands of the Campbells of Cawdor, who held it until 1677, when Sir Hugh Campbell pulled down the castle and moved to Islay House.



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Old Photograph Brass Band Lochgoilhead Scotland


Old photograph of a Brass Band playing in Lochgoilhead, Argyll, Scotland. The mountains above this Scottish village, located at the head of Loch Goil, were used for the scene in the 1963 James Bond film From Russia with Love in which Bond, played by Sean Connery, eliminated two villains in a helicopter by firing gunshots at them. A few miles north of Lochgoilhead, is a junction which on the left goes through Hell's Glen, Loch Fyne, Dunoon, Inverary, Lochawe, Oban, Tyndrum, Glencoe and Fort William. On the right it goes to Glen Croe, Loch Long, Arrochar and Tarbet, Loch Lomond, Glasgow and Crianlarich with the options of travelling to either Inverary and Lochawe, Oban and Fort William, Lochearnhead and Killin.



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Old Photograph Victoria Park Lockerbie Scotland


Old photograph of Victoria Park in Lockerbie, Scotland. A Scottish town in the Dumfries and Galloway region of south-western Scotland. It lies approximately 75 miles from from Glasgow, and 20 miles from the border with England. It had a population of 4,009 at the 2001 census. The town came to international attention in December 1988 when the wreckage of Pan Am Flight 103 crashed there following a terrorist bomb attack aboard the flight.



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Old Photograph Beach Hillswick Shetland Scotland


Old photograph of women and children on the beach at Hillswick, Shetland, Scotland. This island village is on the side of a sheltered voe called Ura Firth, in the north east corner of Mainland. During the days of the Haaf Fishing Hillswick was developed into a fishing station by Thomas Gifford, the Laird of Busta. The village continued to play a role in the fishing industry well into the 20th century, and was often used as a safe haven by trawlers from all over Scotland.



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Old Photograph Windy Gowl Valley Scotland


Old photograph of Windy Gowl valley near Carlops in the Scottish Borders, Scotland.



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Old Photograph Beinn a' Bheithir Loch Leven Scotland


Old photograph of Beinn a' Bheithir above Loch Leven in the Highlands of Scotland. Beinn a' Bheithir, meaning " Mountain of the Thunderbolt " is located to the South of Ballachulish, on the south side of Loch Leven. The mountain was first called Beinn Ghuilbin but is now known as Beinn Bheithir. It got this name from a dragon which, long ago, took shelter in Corrie Liath, a great hollow in the face of the mountain and almost right above Ballachulish Pier. This dragon was apparently a terror to the surrounding district. From the lip of the corrie she overlooked the path round the foot of the mountain and, if the unsuspecting traveller attempted to pass by her, she would leap down and tear him to pieces. No one dared attack her nor could anyone tell how she might be destroyed until Charles, the Skipper, came the way. He anchored his vessel a good distance out from the site of the present pier and, between the vessel and the shore, formed a bridge of empty barrels lashed together with ropes and brisling with iron spikes. When the bridge was finished he kindled a large fire on board the vessel and placed pieces of flesh on the burning embers. As soon as the savour of burning flesh reached the corrie the dragon descended by a succession of leaps to the shore and thence tried to make her way out on the barrels to the vessel. But the spikes entered her body and tore her up so badly that she was nearly dead before she reached the outer edge of the bridge. Meantime the vessel was moved from the bridge until a wide interval was left between it and the last barrel. Over this interval the dragon had not sufficient strength left to leap to the deck of the vessel and, as she could not return the way she came, she died of her wounds where she was, at the end of the bridge.



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