Old Photograph East Parish Church Cromarty Scotland

Old photograph of the East Parish Church in of Cromarty, Scotland. This Scottish church stands on the site of an earlier medieval parish church. The post-Reformation church was significantly enlarged in 1739 when Alexander Mitchell and Donald Robson, masons, and David Sandieson and John Keith, wrights, added a north aisle to create a T-plan church. Further alterations followed in 1756 and 1799.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph St Mark's Episcopal Church Portobello Scotland

Old photographs of St Mark's Episcopal Church in Portobello, Edinburgh, Scotland. This Scottish church was one of the first Episcopal churches to be built in the Edinburgh area, St Mark's is a villa-like neo-Classical church, square in plan, of 1824, most notable for its dome and semi-circular Doric porch.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph Hangman's House Stirling Scotland

Old photograph of the Hangman's House in Stirling, Scotland. Public execution in Stirling was usually handled by the Hangman or Staffman as he was known. This official had his own house on St John’s Street. In the 17th century, executions took place at the Mailing Gallows where the Black Boy Fountain now stands.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph Talmine Scotland

Old photograph of crofters cottages in Talmine, a crofting and fishing township, overlooking Talmine Bay, an inlet on the western shore of Tongue Bay, Northern Sutherland, Scotland.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph Craigenputtock House Scotland

Old photograph of Craigenputtock house in the parish of Dunscore located nine miles North West of Dumfries, Scotland. This Scottish house was the property for generations of the family Welsh, and eventually that of their heiress, Jane Baillie Welsh Carlyle, born 1801, died 1866, descended on the paternal side from Elizabeth, the youngest daughter of John Knox. The Carlyles made this house their home in 1828, and remained there for seven years, before moving to Carlyle's House in Cheyne Row, London, England, Britain. Craigenputtock is where Sartor Resartus by Thomas Carlyle was written. The property was bequeathed by Thomas Carlyle to the Edinburgh University on his death in 1881.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph Pomathorn Scotland

Old photograph of the railway station at Pomathorn near Penicuik, Scotland. The first railway to serve Penicuik in Midlothian was the Peebles Railway, opened in 1855, which had a station named Penicuik uphill from Pomathorn Castle, to the south of the town. This, now closed, station was quite far from the town centre, up a hill and did not serve any industries.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph Cluny Castle Scotland

Old photograph of Cluny Castle near Laggan and Kingussie, Scotland. This Scottish castle was built in 1805 for the MacPhersons of Cluny. The original tower of the Cluny MacPhersons was destroyed in the aftermath of the battle of Culloden in 1746 by government troops, due to MacPherson of Cluny's support of the Jacobite cause. Andrew Carnegie and his wife Louise leased Cluny Castle for nine summers in the late nineteenth century. Carnegie attempted to purchase the castle but the owner refused, and Carnegie subsequently bought Skibo Castle.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.

Old Photograph Archerfield House Scotland

Old photograph of Archerfield House in the parish of Dirleton, East Lothian, Scotland. This Scottish mansion house was built in the late 17th century, and was once the seat of the Nisbet family, feudal barons and lairds of Dirleton. It has Palladian windows, and was substantially rebuilt by architect John Douglas in 1745, and added to and altered throughout the 18th century, notably by Scottish architect Robert Adam who remodelled the interiors in 1790.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

View the most recent Tour Scotland photographs.