Old Photograph Railway Line Leadhills Scotland


Old photograph of the railway line at Leadhills, South Lanarkshire, Scotland. The Leadhills and Wanlockhead Light Railway was a short branch railway built in Scotland to serve mining settlements, high in the Lowther Hills, connecting them to the Carlisle and Carstairs main line. The line was opened in 1901, and was the highest standard gauge railway line in the British Isles. Hoped for developments did not emerge, and when the world lead price slumped in the 1920s, the line sustained heavy losses. It was closed on 2 January 1939.



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Old Photograph Railway Station Loudon Hill Scotland


Old photograph of the railway station below Loudon Hill near Darvel which is located ten miles East of Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland. The railway line ran from Darvel to Loundonhill to Strathaven. The line was single track with loops at stations, the stations had island platforms. The Darvel to Loudonhill section was owned by the Glasgow and South Western Railway and the Loudonhill to Strathaven section owned by the Caledonian Railway. The line had been intended as a through route between Lanarkshire and Ayrshire, however there was very little traffic along the route as the population in the area was very low. The station was closed from September until November 1909 and then again from January 1917 until December 1922.



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Old Photograph Caldercruix Scotland


Old photograph of cottages and people in the village of Caldercruix, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. The nearest major town is Airdrie, 5 miles to the west. The village is about 17 miles east of Glasgow and 30 miles west of Edinburgh. Caldercruix developed in the 19th century as the papermaking and mining industries grew. The village is situated by the North Calder Water and takes its name from the bends or crooks in the river.



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Old Photograph Roads Glencoe Highlands Scotland


Old photograph of the old military road and new road through Glencoe, Highlands, Scotland. Glen Coe where the infamous Massacre of Glencoe took place in 1692, is surrounded by spectacular mountain scenery and is popular with serious hill walkers, rock and ice climbers. It has been seen in numerous films, including Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban as the home of Hagrid. When Thomas Telford came here in the early years of the nineteenth century, surveying his new roads. The only route across Rannoch Moor had been the old Military road, but from Altnafeadh at the bottom of the Devils Staircase all the way through to Ballachulish, although a Drover's Road had been built in 1786.



Tour Scotland Autumn video of a drive West on the A82 road through Glencoe, Scotland. This famous Scottish Glen was the site the of the famous Massacre of Glencoe which began simultaneously in three settlements along the glen at Invercoe, Inverrigan, and Achnacon, although the killing took place all over the glen as fleeing MacDonalds were pursued. 38 MacDonalds from the Clan MacDonald of Glencoe were killed by Campbell guests who had accepted their hospitality. This Highlands location featured a lot in Skyfall the James Bond movie, mainly because it is the most famous Scottish glen and one of the most dramatic landscapes in the world.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Photograph Rose's Temperance Hotel Banff Scotland


Old photograph of Rose's Temperance Hotel in Banff, Scotland. As it was a Temperance Hotel it was not permitted to sell alcohol. The Temperance Scotland Act 1913 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom under which voters in small local areas in Scotland were enabled to hold a poll to vote on whether their area remained " wet " or went " dry, " that is, whether alcoholic drinks should be permitted or prohibited. The decision was made on a simple majority of votes cast. The Act was a result of the strong temperance movement in Scotland before the First World War. Brewers and publicans formed defence committees to fight temperance propaganda,



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Old Photograph Ardwell Hotel Cabrach Scotland


Old photograph of the Ardwell Hotel in Cabrach village in Moray, Scotland. The name means " antler place " in Scottish Gaelic. The forces of Huntly and Errol mustered in Cabrach before the battle of Glenlivet in 1594. The battle is often seen as a religious conflict, and was fought by the Catholic forces of George Gordon, 1st Marquess of Huntly and Francis Hay, 9th Earl of Erroll, who were victorious over the Protestant forces of Archibald Campbell, 7th Earl of Argyll. When the decree of 12 November 1593 came out, by which Catholics were ordered to give up their faith or leave the country, Huntly refused to obey. His continued resistance culminated in the Battle of Glenlivet, where, accompanied by the Earl of Erroll, he engaged Argyll's army above Allt a' Choileachain. The Earl of Huntly's forces consisted of 2,000 Highlanders from Clan Gordon, Clan Hay, Clan Comyn, Clan Cameron, Clan Cumming. The Earl of Argyll's forces consisted of 10,000 Highlanders from Clan Campbell, Clan Murray, Clan Stewart, Clan Forbes, Clan Macgillivray, Clan Maclean, Clan Grant, and the Chattan Confederation of Clan Mackintosh. The Earl of Huntly's force of 2,000 men routed the Earl of Argyll's force of 10,000. Huntly's victory was a dramatic victory of horse and artillery over irregular infantry.



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