Old Photograph Black Watch Perth Perthshire Scotland


Old photograph of World War 1 Black Watch Pipers in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland. The 1st Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 1st Brigade in the 1st Division in August 1914 for service on the Western Front. It saw action during the Retreat from Mons in August 1914, the First Battle of the Marne in September 1914 and the First Battle of the Aisne later in September 1914; it also took part in the advance to the Hindenburg Line in September 1918. The 2nd Battalion landed at Marseille as part of the Bareilly Brigade in the 7th Meerut Division in October 1914 for service on the Western Front. It took part in the defence of Givenchy in December 1915 and then moved to Mesopotamia later that month and saw action during the siege of Kut in Spring 1916, the fall of Baghdad in March 1917 and the Battle of Istabulat in April 1917. It transferred to Palestine in January 1918 and took part in the Battle of Megiddo in September 1918



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Old Photograph Craibstone School of Rural Domestic Economy Scotland


Old photograph of Craibstone School of Rural Domestic Economy by Bucksburn, five miles North of Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Craibstone House was formerly the home of the Pirie family who owned Stoneywood Paper Mills and it was bought by the North of Scotland College of Agriculture in 1913 and this school was set up around 1920. The School was a training college for women who wanted to work on the land and provided training in household work, cookery, laundry, dairying, poultry and bee keeping and farm accounts. The mansion was totally destroyed by fire in January 1953 but a new college was built and the college continued to use the estate for research and experimental work in relation to grassland and crops. However, by 1968 Rural Domestic Economy was no longer a viable course and the School closed.



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Old Photograph Tormaukin Hotel Scotland


Old photograph of Tormaukin Hotel near Gleneagles, Perthshire, Scotland. Tormaukin Hotel, built in the 18th Century, was named after the hill that lies directly behind this old Drovers Inn. In Gaelic, “ Tor ” means Hill and “ Maukin ” means Hare. The name of the Scottish Glen Gleneagles has nothing to do with eagles, and is a corruption of eaglais or ecclesia, meaning church, and refers to the chapel and well of Saint Mungo, which was restored as a memorial to the Haldane family which owns the Gleneagles estate.



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Old Photograph Sail Mhor From Gruinard Bay Scotland


Old photograph of Sail Mhor from Gruinard Bay twelve miles North of Poolewe in Wester Ross, Scotland. Sail Mhor is the final termination of a long ridge extending from An Teallach mountain overlooking Loch Broom. Gruinard Bay has a number of settlements, mainly located on the eastern shore of the bay. On the south east corner, the small hamlet of Little Gruinard is located, where the similar named river leaves land. On the western coast, the former fishing village of Laide, in the nook where the coast turns north, overlooks Gruinard Island to the northeast. Further up the west coast, the villages of Achgarve, the main village of Mellon Udrigle and the smaller crofting township of Opinan.



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Old Photograph Sutors Of Cromarty Scotland


Old photograph of the Sutors Of Cromarty, Cromarty Firth, Scotland. The Sutors are two opposing headlands which mark the entrance to the Cromarty Firth. The North Sutor rises to 486 feet, while the South Sutor reaches 463 feet. Sutor is the Scots word for shoemaker, and local legend tells of two giant shoemakers, the sutors, who used the two cliffs as their workbenches, and tossed their tools to and fro between one another. Both North Sutor and South Sutor carry the remains of substantial military gun emplacements, coastal batteries built in the early 20th century to protect and defend the naval anchorage in the firth, which saw service during both World War I.



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Old Photograph Duncansburgh Church Fort William Scotland


Old photograph of the Alexandra Hotel and Duncansburgh Church in Fort William, Scotland. During the nineteenth century, Sir Duncan Cameron of Fassifern, tried unsuccessfully to rename the town Duncansburgh after himself. The name survived only as the name of the new parish which was created out of Kilmallie parish in 1861. Duncansburgh remained the name of the church and parish reflecting the fact that Sir Duncan Cameron provided the necessary endowment for the quod sacra parish church. By 1878 the church of 1792 was proving too small on account of the eloquent preaching of Mr MacQuarrie and the influx of summer visitors. The present church building was opened or August 1882 when the church leader Professor Charteris preached in English, and Mr Watson of Kiltearn in Gaelic.



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