Old Photograph Andrew Kennedy Hutchison Boyd Glasgow Scotland

Old photograph of Andrew Kennedy Hutchison Boyd in Glasgow, Scotland. Andrew, born 1825, died 1899, was a writer, and son of Reverend Dr. Boyd of Glasgow. He was originally intended for the Bar in England but entered the Church of Scotland, and was minister in St. Andrews, Fife. He graduated B.A. at Glasgow in April 1846, and at the end of 1850 was licensed as a preacher by the presbytery of Ayr. For several months Boyd was assistant in St. George's parish, Edinburgh, and on 18 September 1851 he was ordained parish minister of Newton-on-Ayr, where he succeeded John Caird. In 1854, he became minister of Kirkpatrick-Irongray, near Dumfries. In April 1859, Boyd was appointed to the parish of St. Bernard's, Edinburgh. In May 1890, he was appointed moderator of the general assembly. Boyd married, in 1854, Margaret Buchanan, eldest daughter of Captain Kirk, 71st regiment, of Carrickfergus, Ireland. She predeceased him in 1895. In 1897, he married, for the second time, Janet Balfour, daughter of Mr. Leslie Meldrum, Devon, Clackmannan, She survived him, with five sons and one daughter of his first wife's family. He died in 1899 and was interred in the Eastern Cemetery of St Andrews. South of the cathedral, against the south wall, with his first wife.



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Old Photograph Hotel Rodel Island Of Harris Scotland

Old photograph of the hotel in Rodel, Isle of Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Located near the harbour is Rodel Hotel. This was built in 1781 and was originally home to Captain Alexander MacLeod of Berneray who had bought the Isle of Harris in 1779. Captain Alexander MacLeod proceeded to establish fishing stations and other schemes. Rodel, though, like much of the rest of Harris, was cleared beginning in 1817 by Captain MacLeod's grandson, Alexander Norman Macleod, and the population removed to Berneray and the Bays. The first tacksman was Donald Stewart, who occupied the landlord's house.



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Old Photograph Cutting The Sod Light Railway Lauder Scotland

Old photograph of the Countess of Lauderdale cutting the first sod of the Light Railway in Lauder in the Scottish Borders 27 miles South East of Edinburgh, Scotland. The Lauder Light Railway was a railway line opened in 1901 to connect the remote agricultural settlement of Lauder in Berwickshire with the main line of the Waverley Route railway at Fountainhall. Traffic was never heavy and bus competition led to closure to passengers in 1932.



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Old Photograph Railway Station North Queensferry Scotland

Old photograph of the railway station in North Queensferry in Fife, Scotland. This Scottish village is located on the Firth of Forth, between the Forth Railway Bridge and the Forth Road Bridge, and 10 miles from Edinburgh. Although the station was not in service by the time of the opening of the Forth Bridge in March 1890, it was in use soon after. The station replaced the station at North Queensferry Pier, which had been opened in 1874 to take passengers to and from the ferry across the Forth.



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Old Photograph Tay Bridge Hotel Newburgh Fife Scotland

Old photograph of the Tay Bridge Hotel at the West End of Newburgh, Fife, Scotland. For some time, the industries here chiefly consisted of the making of linen and floorcloth, malting and quarrying, and there was fishing, especially of Salmon. But most of these industries have now gone. A linoleum factory, owned by Courtaulds, which had been the town's principal employer, closed in May 1980 after a large fire destroyed much of the building.



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Old Photograph Fishing Boats Broughty Ferry Scotland

Old photograph of fishing boats by Broughty Ferry, Dundee, Scotland. Formerly a prosperous fishing and whaling village, in the 19th century Broughty Ferry, on the north bank of the Firth of Tay. became a haven for wealthy jute barons from Dundee, who built their luxury villas in the suburb. As a result, Broughty Ferry was referred to at the time as the “ richest square mile in Europe ”.



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