Old Photograph Longformacus House Scotland

Old photograph of Longformacus House in Berwickshire, Scotland. This Scottish mansion house was built in the 18th century by William Adam.

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Old Photograph War Memorial South Ronaldsay Scotland

Old photograph of the War Memorial in St Margaret's Hope on South Ronaldsay on the Orkney Islands, Scotland. The memorial was by Alexander Carrick, born in 1882 in the small town of Musselburgh, just east of Edinburgh, he was one of Scotland's leading monumental sculptors of the early part of the 20th century. War memorials featuring his carved sculptures include Lochawe, Killin, Oban, St Margaret's Hope, Kinghorn, Newburgh and Auchtermuchty in Fife.

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Tour Scotland Video David Low Singing Red Rooster Greyfriars Bar Perth Perthshire



Tour Scotland video of David Low singing a cover version of Red Rooster by Willie Dixon on visit to the Greyfriars Bar in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland.

Well, I got a little red rooster
Too lazy to crow for day
Well, I got a little red rooster
Too lazy to crow for day
Keep everything in the barnyard
Upset in [Incomprehensible]

Well, the dogs begin to bark
Hound begin to howl
Well, the dogs begin to bark
Hound begin to howl
Oh, watch out, strange kind people
Little red rooster is on the prowl

Oh, if you see my little red rooster
Please drag him home
Well, if you see my little red rooster
Please drag him home
There no peace in the barnyard
Since the little red rooster been gone

I got a little red rooster
Too lazy to crow for day
Oh, I got a little red rooster
Too lazy to crow for day
Keep everything in the barnyard
Upset in every way

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Tour Scotland Video Aly Bell Singing Daisy Greyfriars Bar Perth Perthshire



Tour Scotland video of Aly Bell Singing Daisy on visit to the Greyfriars Bar in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland. Daisy is a song written by Aly.

All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Photograph Chapelton Scotland

Old photograph of Chapelton, South Lanarkshire, Scotland. This Scottish village is located approximately halfway between the towns of East Kilbride and Strathaven, on the A726 road. It is in the former Parish of Glassford, which takes its name from the nearby village of the same name.

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Old Photograph Glenboig Scotland

Old photograph of the railway station in Glenboig, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. This Scottish railway station closed in 1960 and the local coal mining and brick-making industries ceased by the 1980s. The Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway was started in 1824, and opened in 1826, running from Palacecraig up through Coatbridge and Gartsherrie, and immediately to the east of Glenboig village. It claims to be Scotland's first actual " railway ", putting it among the first few in the world. A few years later, in 1831, the Glasgow and Garnkirk line opened, running on the other side of Glenboig, joining the Monkland and Kirkintilloch at Gartsherrie. These were the earlier Scottish lines to use locomotives. Both were built almost exclusively to carry coal but each, however, developed an increasing volume of other freight and of passenger traffic.

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Old Photograph Delnabo House Scotland

Old photograph of Delnabo House located a mile to the East of Tomintoul in Moray, Scotland. In 1647, after evading pursuit for several months by constantly changing his hiding place, George Gordon, 2nd Marquess of Huntly was captured by Lieutenant-colonel Menzies at midnight, as he was retiring to bed, at Delnabo House in Strathdon. The capture was effected after a severe struggle with the ten gentlemen and servants who were in attendance on him, six of whom were slain in their efforts to defend him. On the news of his capture becoming known, about five hundred men under Grant of Carron assembled to effect his rescue, but Menzies, for greater security, carried him to the castle of Blairfindie in Glenlivet. Huntly, on learning their intentions, also sent them a message, dissuading them from the enterprise. When news of his capture reached the committee of estates, it was debated whether he should be immediately executed or reprieved till the meeting of parliament, and the latter motion was carried by one vote. After remaining two days at Leith, he was delivered up to the magistrates of Edinburgh, and sent to the Tolbooth. There he remained until 22nd of March 1649, when by order of the Scots parliament he was beheaded at the cross of Edinburgh. On being asked by one of the presbyterian ministers who attended him whether he wished to be absolved from the sentence of excommunication that had been passed against him, he answered " that as he was not accustomed to give ear to false prophets, he did not wish to be troubled by him." Although he refused to admit that he had acted contrary to the laws, or had done anything to deserve death, he declared that he freely forgave those who had voted for his death. His body was brought to Seton, and was interred in the burial-place of that family.

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Old Photograph Craigentinny House Scotland

Old photograph of Craigentinny House, Edinburgh, Scotland. This was originally a typical laird's house of the late 16th century; parts of it were altered early in the 19th century. It was built originally for the Nisbets of Dean. In 1760 it was purchased by William Miller a wealthy Edinburgh Seed Merchant. His grandson, William Henry Miller born 1789, died 31 October 1848, a Scottish book collector and parliamentarian who sat in the House of Commons from 1830 to 1837, had the house extended and modernized in 1869. He died, unmarried, at Craigentinny House in his sixtieth year, and was by his own desire buried on his estate in a mausoleum erected after his decease, and decorated with sculptured friezes by Alfred Gatley.

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