Old Photograph Harry Lauder Scotland

Old photograph of Harry Lauder who was born on 4 August 1870 in Portobello in Edinburgh, Scotland. Harry was the eldest of seven children to John Lauder, a potter, and his wife Isabelle née Macleod. John Lauder, was a descendent of Lauders of the Bass, and Isabella was born in Arbroath in Angus, to a family from the Black Isle. Lauder's father moved to Newbold, Derbyshire, England, in 1882 to take up a job designing china, but died of pneumonia later that year. Upon his death, Isabella moved the family to Arbroath and Harry worked part-time at the local flax. The following year he moved independently to Hamilton, South Lanarkshire where he was employed as a miner, a job which he maintained for the next decade. On 19 June 1891, at age 21, Lauder married Ann, daughter of James Vallance, a colliery manager in Hamilton. At around that time, Lauder initiated a singing career and gained a reasonable reputation as a singer and comedian with local concert parties. To pass the time, Lauder sang to fellow miners who encouraged him to perform in local music halls. While singing in nearby Larkhall, he received 5 shillings, the first time he was paid for singing. He received further engagements including a weekly " go as you please " night held by Mrs. Christina Baylis at her Scotia Music Hall, Metropole Theatre in Glasgow. By the 1900s, Lauder had become the highest paid performer in the world, and was the first Scottish artist to sell a million records. He raised vast amounts of money for the war effort during World War I, for which he was subsequently knighted in 1919. He went into semi retirement in the mid 1930s, but briefly emerged to entertain troops in World War II. By the late 1940s he was suffering from long periods of ill health and died in Scotland in 1950.

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Old Photograph Neilson Institute Paisley Scotland

Old photograph of the Neilson Institute in Paisley by Glasgow, Scotland. The John Neilson Educational Institution at Oakshawhead, Paisley, opened to pupils in April 1852. John Neilson was a Paisley grocer who died in 1839, aged 61, and was buried in Paisley Abbey. John Neilson's will directed a large portion of his wealth to be used to build a school and to establish a fund to finance the education of boys who would not otherwise be able to afford an education. His nephew, Archibald Gardner, was one of the executors and he dedicated himself to the task of establishing the school.

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Old Photograph Pat Crerand Scotland

Old photograph of Pat Crerand who was born on 19 February 1939 to Irish immigrants in the Gorbals area of Glasgow, Scotland. His father, Michael Crerand, was from Newtownstewart, County Tyrone, Ireland, and his mother, Sarah Boyle, was from Gweedore, County Donegal, where Crerand spent much of his childhood. His father was killed on 12 March 1941 in a German air raid on John Brown's Shipyard in Clydebank, where he was working the fire watch on the night of his death; Crerand was two years old. Pat became a Scottish former footballer. After six years at Celtic he moved to Manchester United in England, where he was a member of teams that won the English League title twice, the FA Cup and European Cup. He also gained 16 international caps for Scotland.

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Old Photograph Aikenhead House Glasgow Scotland

Old photograph of Aikenhead House in Kings Park in Glasgow, Scotland. The last private owner of this Scottish mansion house was Mr Henry Erskine Gordon, born 1849, died 1929, the grandson of John Gordon who had built the house. Mr Gordon died at home on 12th April 1929. The first Gordon of Aikenhead was a principal partner in the extensive West India firm of Somervell, Gordon and Company afterwards Stirling, Gordon and Company. His father, Alexander Gordon, by his wife, Isabel Fleming, daughter of John Fleming, a prosperous maltman, acquired a considerable section of land on the banks of St. Enoch's Burn, then a trout stream, running through St. Enoch's Square, and emptying itself into the Clyde, near the bridge. Here he built a handsome and substantial house on the north side of the old Westergate, in which he and his family resided for many years. About the time the American colonies rebelled, Mr. Gordon's neighbouring laird, Andrew Buchanan, son of Maltman George, who died in 1737, laid out in the Lang Croft several steadings for feuing, running north from Mr. Gordon's house, now known as Buchanan Street. On one of these feus James Johnston, a Glasgow merchant, built an elegant house, a short way north of the present Arcade. The failure of so many of the Virginia merchants during the progress of the war put a complete stop to building operations for a time, and Mr. Johnston's house stood alone among the vacant feus for many years, its garden occupying the site of Prince's Court. This house and garden were bought by John Gordon, and occupied by him as his town house until his death. He also purchased the estate of Aikenhead from Robert Scot, of the Thistle Bank, on which he built a spacious country house in 1806. Many of the older Glasgow merchants remember Mr. Gordon well. At the time when political feeling ran high, he and his partner, Charles Stirling, were esteemed the leaders of the Tory party in Glasgow. Mr. Gordon has been described as a stately, well made gentleman, of somewhat lofty bearing, enhanced by his style of dress; for notwithstanding the varied changes of fashion and custom, he kept to the last by the knee breeches, ruffles, and powdered hair. He was greatly respected by his brother traders and by the public, as an upright and honourable merchant, a good citizen, and a benevolent and hospitable gentleman. He was appointed chairman of the Chamber of Commerce in 1804 and 1805. He was twice married, first to a daughter of John Alston, merchant and banker, Glasgow. Their only child married Mungo Campbell, of John Campbell and Company. On the death of his first wife, Mr. Gordon married a daughter of Gilbert Hamilton, Lord Provost in 1792-93, and first secretary of the Chamber of Commerce. John Gordon of Aikenhead, their only son, occupied the estate and died in 1828.

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Old Photograph Reverend Henry Williamson Dundee Scotland

Old photograph of Reverend Henry Williamson in Dundee, Scotland. Henry was the founder and honorary president of the Dundee Mill and Factory workers operatives Union. He was born in Surrey, England, in 1839 he had a brother John born 1841 and sisters Ann, born in 1846 and Jane, born in 1849. His parents were Charles Williamson and Harriet Edgeley again from Surrey. Henry became A unitarian minister in Dundee in 1866, he was one of the longest serving ministers there and the church is called the Williamson memorial chapel after him.

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Old Photograph Golf Course Alness Scotland

Old photograph of the golf course in Alness near the Cromarty Firth, Scotland. This Scottish golf course has been around since 1904 and has undergone some significant changes in the last 100 years. The most significant was the 1997 extension from nine to 18 holes.

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Old Photograph Tommy Ring Scotland

Old photograph of Tommy Ring who was born on 8 August 1930 in Glasgow, Scotland. Tommy was a Scottish footballer who played for Ashfield, Clyde, Everton, Barnsley in England, Aberdeen, Fraserburgh, Stevenage Town and the Scotland national team. He is perhaps best known for his time at Scottish club Clyde, during which he won the Scottish Cup in 1955 and 1958. Ring scored the winning goal in the replayed 1955 Scottish Cup Final, against Celtic. Ring also won Scottish Division Two championships in 1951-52 and 1956-57.

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Old Photograph Police Station Kirkcaldy Scotland

Old photograph of the Police Station n Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. The 1903 Burgh Police Station once contained a Court House, jail, mortuary, exercise yard and stables. Officers policed Kirkcaldy on foot, horseback and bicycle, policing a population of over 34,000 persons. In 1949 Fife Constabulary was formed combining Kirkcaldy Burgh and Dunfermline City Police.

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